Pregancy Files – Weeks 4-8

For some people there is still nothing to report at this stage, others will be throwing up day and night and feeling rubbish. Even if you have been pregnant before, each experience will be different so you can’t assume you know what’s coming. Most of us in the UK will need to book an appointment with a Midwife via our GP – they usually don’t want to see you until around Week 10 as in these early stages 1 in 4 pregnancies will end in miscarriage.

This is a horrid subject to discuss, but it’s worth reflecting on just for a moment. Some women will have a miscarriage at a very early stage and not even know, it may just feel like a very heavy period. It may happen before you have even told friends and family (or just after :(). This is why who and when to tell your news needs to be thought through… We have always waited until after the first scan – around Week 12 to share our news ‘publicly’ this was after a sad experience our first time round. However, it’s likely you will want the kindness and support of your closest people whether things go well or not, so you may want to tell a few choice individuals. We have experienced this more than once, in January we miscarried twins at 11 weeks which we are still learning to come to terms with. There are lots of great professional support systems out there if you ever need them a good one in the UK is The Miscarriage Association. People will often talk about ‘losing’ a baby, which I really dislike as it makes me sound careless – I didn’t loose them, it wasn’t a choice.

If you have experienced a previous miscarriage you may be able to get an early ‘reassurance’ scan via your local EPAC (Early Pregnancy Assessment Centre), this will probably be in your local hospital.

On a more positive note, this is such an exciting time. So much is happening to the tiny life inside you, not much of which you will know about! There are lots of apps and websites around that you can sign up to for a weekly digest of what’s going on, they are likely to offer you vegetable and fruit sizes as a comparison to baby’s rapid growth and some photos of what baby looks like – in the very early stages it won’t look much like a baby so these can be a bit unnerving.

The most common experience at this stage is incredible tiredness, if you are able to just sleep when you can, if you care for others this is hard, but make sure you eat well, drink lots of water and rest as much as possible. If you are in the loo every few minutes, or throwing up they are all positive signs – really it will all be worth it in the end xx

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